1. "

    Fuck Translink

    "
    — Ancient Brisbane Proverb (via yungbrndn)

    (Source: sailor-star-trek, via praise-science)

     

  2. Ecuador turns military buildings into hospitals, parks

    Ecuador will cut its military by 51% over the next 10 years, teleSUR English said on August 28. Ecuadorian defence minister Maria Fernanda Espinosa announced the army´s 516 units would be cut to 252.

    The measure aims to optimise Ecuador’s military presence nationally. “We know now what we have, how to maintain it, and what we need,” she told the press.

    She said at least 600 hectares of urban spaces will be made available by 2025. This is on top of the 30,000 hectares of rural spaces already delivered by the army to the Ministry of Agriculture and Environment for protection.

    Inmobiliar, the government institution in charge of managing public land, will assess and determine the future use of the lands. The lands may be converted into parks, used for new schools, hospitals, centres for children or community police units. However, they will not be for private use or real estate.

    The numbers of soldiers will be lowered to 34,500 men and women, said Espinosa. She said the cuts would not be obtained by sackings, but by limiting the numbers of students in training schools.

    Guatemala: Cubans teach thousands to read

    From 2007 until now, almost 20,000 Guatemalans have learned to read and write through a Cuban program, teleSUR English said on August 28.

    At least 19,425 Guatemalans have studied in the Cuban literacy program, dubbed “Yo Si Puedo” (“I can do it”), said the national coordinator Vielma Monteagudo.

    The program has about 28 volunteer workers operating across six Guatemalan states, including the capital. The program uses a unique Cuban education model, developed specifically for mature age students eager to learn how to read and write. It is adapted specifically to the geographic areas where it is implemented. Local vocabulary is also used.

    The program has been used in more than 30 countries, ranging from Venezuela to Nigeria and Australia. Nearly four million people have benefited from the initiative worldwide, the Cuban government says.

    Cuba itself has one of the highest rates of literacy in Latin America, at around 99.8%, according to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation.

    Cuba says socialism ‘viable’ amid global crisis

    Cuba defended the viability of socialism amid the current world crisis at the 20th Sao Paulo Forum held in Bolivia, the Cuban News Agency said on August 26.

    Idalmis Brooks, secretary of the International Relations Department of the Cuban Communist Party, said a change in the world map has taken place since the start of the world crisis, due to the interests of the superpowers.

    For Brooks, beyond its economic impact, the crisis has led to protests and conflicts in regions such as the Middle East, and has also favoured a capitalist counter-offensive with marked strength in Latin America.

    Brooks said the economic transformations underway in Cuba were aimed at preserving the achievements in the areas of health, education and the social role of women.

    Cuba promotes the idea that integration-based processes in this part of the world must be marked by unity and mutual respect for differences, said Brooks.

    The forum took place on August 28 and 29, featuring 300 delegates from many left-wing parties. Participants analysed the challenges faced by Latin America’s regional integration process, among other issues.

     
  3. fuckyeahanarchopunk:

    Ritz hotel in Barcelona. Collectivized by the anarchists (CNT) and socialists (UGT) as soup kitchen during the Civil War.

    1936-1937. The short summer of anarchy in Catalonia and Aragon. 

    (via leftside1312)

     

  4. Anonymous said: Oh please. Capitalism: To each according to one’s own hard work. Read a book! :)

    southern-feminism:

    Oh, shit, you’re right… OH WAIT. What’s this…


    Working poor? But I thought hard work always rendered wealth????? OMG LOOK AT THIS SHIT THOUGH.

    More poor people in America have a job than not??? WHAAAAATT? But, graph, anon told me hard work yields wealth!

    Well would you take a fucking look at this. Do you know what this means? Not only are all these hard workers poor (but hard work makes people rich????), but capitalism is also hella racist. Socialism and communism both give everyone the same opportunities, but why would we want that?! That would take white privilege out of the world of work. Equal opportunity for all colors? Fuck that, right? I prefer capitalism, where the class system and minimal regulation of business allows blatant discrimination in the work place.

    I mean, surely the rich get rich by working hard and being honest. This is America, right?


    Whoa! Excuse me, graph? Anon told me hard work yielded wealth??? This can’t be right! The actual workers of corporations bust their asses to make the profit for the corporations??? If this were the case, that would mean that CEOs *gasp* STEAL profit from workers???? WHAAAATTT?????

    Hard work does not render wealth in a capitalist setting, or the term “working poor” wouldn’t exist. Look around you! :)

     
  5. militantweasel:

    On a lighter note, here are some pictures from us crashing the corporate Pride parade with a Pink Bloc that had fun without paying the ridiculously high registration fee. We won’t pay, to be queer! The Pink Bloc originated at May Day and its participants have created a range of creative forms of queer resistance, from the organization Glitur, to the “Drag Out Capitalism” drag show during Pride weekend.  A vibrant, radical queer movement is emerging in Seattle, and the police are not going to stop us.

    http://blackorchidcollective.wordpress.com/2012/06/28/pride/

    (via anarcutie)

     

  6. revolutionarycheese said:sounds like a Peak Liberal

    Yeah, I think so.

     

  7. Does anyone else remember that time when someone said that Hugo Chavez was the Venezuelan equivalent of Mitt Romney?

    I just remembered that and I am still so confused by it.

     

  8.  

  9. The appointment of dictator Prayuth Chan-ocha as prime minister by his hand-picked military parliament was such an unsurprising non-event that Prayuth did not even bother to attend. The so-called “vote” was unanimous.

    Prayuth has set himself up as Thailand’s “Supremo”, placing himself in charge of all important posts. This harks back to the dark old days of the military dictatorships in the 1960s and 1970s.

    As acclaimed writer Wat Wanyangkoon said: “The junta is detritus left over from the Cold War.”

    Prayuth’s junta is brutal and stupid. It is brutal in its crack-down on pro-democracy activists, the use of the lese-majeste (insulting the monarch) law to jail its opponents, and the use of violence against detainees.

    It is stupid in its attempts to create an image that the coup has created “peace and happiness” among citizens.

    Prayuth also loves to strut around barking orders in a pathetic quest to appear like some out-dated “strongman”. There are more Thai political activists living in exile now than at any other period since the bloody crack-down at Thammasart University in 1976.

    The junta claims it is in the process of “reforming” the Thai political system. The real meaning of this process is to set up a Burmese-style pretend democracy where people will be allowed to take part in elections, but the military and the conservative anti-democrats hold real power.

    Reactionary middle-class academics, self-serving government officials and most of the media are going along with this process. They think that they can fool the population into believing that these are real “reforms”, but they are only deluding themselves and those who have weak minds.

     

  10. The barriers are going up across south Wales. Huge steel fences block off buildings, including Cardiff castle. Roads are closed. Children are promised a shorter school day or maybe no school at all. Rail services are disrupted.

    All so that a group of politicians and military men can meet in a country hotel outside Newport for a September 4 and 5 NATO summit to plan more of the military interventions that have contributed to a world now more seriously threatened by major wars than at any time since 1945.

    NATO might regard this summit as an occasion for reflection on what exactly has gone wrong with its policies. There is plenty to choose from.

    Afghanistan may be preparing for the exit of most NATO troops this year, but the news that the Taliban has once again taken control of Sangin province ― site of the majority of British casualties in the country ― hardly looks like success.

    It pales into insignificance next to Libya, though. Here, two lots of militias are fighting one another. One has taken control of the airport at Tripoli and destroyed it.

    Meanwhile, planes from the UAE, operating from Egyptian bases, have just bombed the Islamic militia. Europeans have, by and large, fled the country, bombed only three years ago in the name of humanitarian intervention.

     

  11. "As long as Western liberal democracies can name “gay rights” as the new litmus test for an appropriate twenty-first century democracy, we can obsess about “anti-gay” legislation in Nigeria and say nothing about the violence and economic exploitation of the Shell Oil Company on the land and bodies of Nigerians. We can be seduced by the international gay travel industry to visit “gay friendly” (and “post-racial paradise”) Rio de Janeiro, and say nothing of the massive police violence and genocidal removal of blacks from favelas in preparation for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics. Is it any wonder that many people outside of the United States, particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa, have grown resentful of increasing threats to pull critical funding by NGOs and Western nations for not being “LGBT friendly,” while we let all other sorts of violence and exploitation (often by corporations and evangelical churches that originate within the West) go unmentioned?"
     
  12. throwherinthewater:

    Huey (Agnes Varda, 1968)

    Watch in full here.

    (via sleepy-socialist)

     
  13. peakcapitolism:

    maad-villainy:

    Cultural Marxism Is The Imminent Destruction of Western Civilization As We Know It.

    GOOD

     

  14. churayl:

    Pakistan is not your talking point, it isn’t your political news of the day, the trending global current affair you want to learn so you seem more cultured to your friends. It’s not your choice blogging topic. It isn’t Gaza or Ferguson. Sometimes spreading awareness can backfire and do more harm than good. Why are you caring about Pakistan now when this protest was under way for the last two weeks and when many people were discontented with the Nawaz regime for the past year? How can you say anything about it when you don’t take loadshedding into account and in fact have never sweltered in the summer without air conditioning because the circulation of electricity is limited and available foremost to the rich and privileged, something directly contributing to the people’s agitation? How can you say anything about it when you know nothing about the military dictatorship Pakistanis suffered in the 1990s and the recent 2000s? Are you only caring about it now because the crisis has escalated, friction and violence have increased and it’s going to make headlines and receive more attention? You will view this event in an isolated vacuum, decontextualized from the factors that produced it in the first place. Martial law is imminent. The bourgeois democracy we suffered has all the traits of a regime, but a military coup cannot help us again. 

    My only request is to be sensitive in how you circulate information. My only request is that you don’t sensationalize it. My only request is that you don’t use language that trivializes and insults the people on the ground just because they’re faraway from you. You cannot understand a political crisis without knowing the 60+ year long history of the country, its institutional dynamics, the praetorianism that has characterized the state since its inception. And most importantly, you cannot understand this without knowing the mood, hope and aspirations of the people in the face of mass poverty, government corruption and military subjugation. The masses are being manipulated and used as pawns. Their rightful rage against bourgeois democracy that is both class exploitative and repressive in freedom of speech is being coopted by highly opportunistic and dishonest politicians cum demagogues, Tahir al-Qadri and Imran Khan, who care more about expanding their power than on nation-building and helping the people, and who are most likely in cahoots with the military. Seasoned Pakistani activist Lal Khan described it best

    Khan is a right-wing politician with religious and national chauvinism at the core of his ideological bearings. Qadri is an impostor mixing religious mysticism and demagogic sloganeering including references to poverty, deprivation and welfare, but this is more rhetorical than any serious programme. Both are staunch supporters of free market economics, foreign investment and neoliberal capitalism and, hypothetically speaking, if they ever came into power, they would be steered by the military, imperialism, and financial institutions like the World Bank and the IMF…

    and

    The PTI of Imran Khan, with its azaadi march, has no real solution for the woes of the populace. Qadri’s revolution does not even have a name, what to say of a concrete programme or a strategy. Both totally fail to call for even the basic of human needs, i.e. free health and education. They will not dare call for the nationalisation of corporate vultures known as the IPPs to end the curse of load shedding. The PTI leadership is actually a reunion of old Aitchisonians. None of them would ever call for the nationalisation of their mother institution, built by the British imperialists to create and educate a class for the perpetuation of their colonial rule. It is an institution reflecting the grandeur of the colonial and postcolonial elite, disgustingly slavish to their imperialist bosses.

    Health and education are the most profitable businesses after the drug trade and ransom in today’s Pakistan. Both these radical forces cannot touch these and other leeching enterprises as their support and finances are dependent on these very entrepreneurs and imperialist monopolies. For that matter, all political parties of the present bourgeois political order are representatives of these different black and grey crony capitalist and feudal classes. These ‘freedom’ and ‘revolution’ marches are in fact primitive putsches to derail and subvert the real tide of a revolutionary tide that can erupt from below. The serious strategists of capital can feel the heat of this seething revolt underneath the surface. They are terrified of a volcanic explosion of society. Once that class struggle erupts with a Marxist leadership it will be unstoppable; the state, clergy and the political elite will be swept away. The capitalist, landlord and imperialist stranglehold shall be obliterated. It will break this boisterous stagnation and society will surge ahead towards a socialist victory. 

    [x]

    What we’re seeing unfolding in Pakistan right now may be an engineered military coup or the army propping up the political puppets that will most closely cater to its interests and appease the severely agitated people. The state police feel threatened by the organized protesters in their tens and thousands and react in police brutality. The economy has suffered under Nawaz, Pakistan has come into the yoke of the IMF and the energy crisis is neverending. The military has already become involved as a so-called ‘mediator’ when in reality it possesses foremost control over the situation because it is the most powerful institution in Pakistani society. Pro-Musharraf and dictatorship people have already come out of the woodwork and are calling for army intervention. In the end, the people lose. For them, both openly military and democratic regimes are exploitative, murderous and oppressive. Keep the average working class Pakistani foremost in mind whenever you blog, tweet, or post about this. They’re the ones who are most adversely affected by this, and they’re the ones paying for it with their lives.

    (via justanotherwastedyouth)

     

  15. Listen/purchase: Well Soon by Walter Mitty and his Makeshift Orchestra

    Current favourite thing